Hergé 100 VI

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Our celebration of Hergé’s centenary continues! Today’s drawing is by the Bunker’s own T. Thorhauge. His debut, Det der går forud is still available from Fahrenheit, and the French edition, Table rase, published by Éditions Rackham, can be acquired here. Other significant comics work can be found in Rackham #2, 4 & 5 as well as Forandringstegn and the two BLÆK books – see our ‘works’ section for more info. He doesn’t have a website besides this one, but a lot of his writing can be found at Rackham. Also, there’s a really old interview with him here, and another here (both in Danish, unfortunately).

Also, check out the artwork in the previous instalments, by Mårdøn Smet, Miwer, Johan Krarup, Peter Kielland-Brandt and Ole Comoll Christensen. And be sure to read our freewheeling discussion of Hergé’s work .

Hergé 100 V

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Our celebration of Hergé’s centenary continues! Today’s drawing, which refers to the wrong number gag that runs through several of the late Tintin books, is by Ole Comoll Christensen, one of the most versatile comics artists on the Danish scene.

The ballon reads: “Hello? Yes M’am, it’s the butcher’s… Oh, you got the wrong number?”

Ole works within classic mainstream idioms as well as different experimental styles: his books includes the imaginative parallel dimension detective series Dimensionsdetektiven as well as a number of small press books and a long list of innovative anthology work published around Europe. American comics readers may know him without being aware of it from his extensive background work for Peter Snejbjerg on a number of DC and Vertigo titles. Visit his website here and read his Lambiek entry here.
 
 
 
 

Also, check out the artwork in the previous instalments, by Mårdøn Smet, Miwer, Johan Krarup and Peter Kielland-Brandt. And be sure to read our freewheeling discussion of Hergé’s work .

Hergé 100 IV

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Our celebration of Hergé’s centenary continues! Today’s drawing, inspired by the back covers of the old Danish editions of the Tintin books, is by Peter Kielland-Brandt, one of the veterans of the innovative 70s generation of Danish cartoonists and one of our most original voices. His website can be seen here, his Lambiek entry here, and an archive of assorted old work here. An American edition of his masterful pantomime Fish is available and can be purchased here or here, while the original Danish edition is available from Fahrenheit. In 2006, he finished his epic, 10-years-in-the-making Jernpotte, which unfortunately has not been translated but which anyone who can read Danish should take a look at.

Also, check out the artwork in the previous instalments, by Mårdøn Smet, Miwer, and Johan Krarup. And be sure to read our freewheeling discussion of Hergé’s work .

Hergé 100 III

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Continuing our celebration of Hergé’s centenary, today’s drawing is by Johan Krarup, one of the premier representatives of the new Danish underground. Read his weekly strip “Mixed Double” here, His publishing outfit Son of A Horse can be found here, and he sometimes writes a column about alternative comics here. Johan is also a philosophy graduate and blogs about it here.

Also, check out the artwork in the previous instalments, by Mårdøn Smet and Miwer. And be sure to check our freewheeling discussion of Hergé’s work here.

Danish Bookbinders’ Awards to be handed out today

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Today, the Association of Danish Bookbinders will be presenting their selection of 2006 books at the Museum of Arts and Crafts (Kunstindustrimuseet) in Copenhagen. As mentioned earlier, Rackham’s big anthology of Danish comics and cartoon art BLÆK is part of the it. I won’t be there, but I think both T. Thorhauge (co-editor and contributor) and Frederik Storm (designer) will. Show up, take a look at the books and drink some wine, if you have time!

Re: Rall under observation

Just to follow up on my recent post on cartoonist Ted Rall, along with a plethora of other “activists”, including a number of hip hop MCs being put under surveillance by the NYPD in the months leading up to the 2003 Republican National Convention in New York, I wanted to link to this instalment of Rall’s syndicated column about the issue. He is convinced that he is under FBI observation and that his phone is being tapped.

Did Hergé die of AIDS?

Strange news at this time of celebration: Philippe Goddin, the editor of the massive ouevre catalogue of Hergé’s that is being published these years and author of an upcoming biography, has just stated in an interview that he is convinced that Hergé died not of leukemia as has hitherto been the belief, but of AIDS. He would have been infected through one of the weekly blood transfusions he was taking for a rare hereditary disease he was suffering from (at the time, transfusions were carried out without checking for HIV infection). “He started being plagued by influenzas, pneumonia and repeated bronchitis, none of which seemed related to the disease he had been suffering from for years,” says Goddin.

Happy Centenary, Hergé!

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Today it is the centenary of Georges Remi, better known as Hergé, the creator of Tintin!

To celebrate here at the Bunker, where we love his work, we have asked a number of Danish cartoonists to contribute drawings commemorating the anniversary. First up is Mårdøn Smet, the virtuoso veteran of Danish comics. Read more about him here, check out this small archive of his old work, and be aware that BLÆK contains some of his very best comics work (in pantomime, so there’s no language barrier!). Also, be sure to check our freewheeling discussion of Hergé’s work here.